Gone With the Winter Wind

“The cattle business became a fad–a fashion. Rich men’s sons, college and university graduates, foreign investors in France, England and Scotland put their money in the business.” (Bartlett, History of Wyoming, Vol. 1)

The Cheyenne Club opened its doors in 1881. It was three stories tall with a kitchen and wine room in the basement. Servants trained in the East poured the finest liquors, which were brought in by train. Two vaults for the expensive wines. Caviar.

Members enjoyed a billiards room and a reading room with magazines and newspapers from the East. The club was decorated with paintings and thick carpets.

While the cattlemen dined in luxury, the cattle were left to fend for themselves during the winter, to find grass and unfrozen water or die. Even at the time, other people pitied the distressed animals.

The harsh winter of 1886-7 killed more cattle than usual, and the investors lost money. That spelled the end of their Cheyenne Club. Here’s a photograph of their grand building.

References:

Bartlett, I.S., ed. History of Wyoming, Vol. 1. Chicago, S.J .Clark, 1918

Dary, David. Seeking Pleasure in the Old West. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1995.

Larson, T.A. History of Wyoming. University of Nebraska Press, 1965.

The Old West: The Cowboys. New York, Time-Life Books, 1973.

 

 

A Frank Lloyd Wright Clubhouse in Hawaii

Two weeks ago, I posted here about the Oak Park, Illinois, neighborhood with several homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. When I was in Maui last week on vacation, I had to take a look at a golf clubhouse from designs by Frank Lloyd Wright.

I drove up the hill with two golfers, my husband and our friend Larry Franklin, who raved about the golf course, but our first look at the clubhouse startled us. Overlooking a large valley, hugging a hillside, the clubhouse looks futuristic.

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You see a small part of the valley below.
You see a small part of the valley below.

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Built in 1993, decades after the passing of Wright, the clubhouse of the King Kamehameha Golf Club, is from archived Frank Lloyd Wright designs for a structure or structures that were never built. They were adapted by Taliesin Architects.

Check out the link above. It has photos of a side with circular windows, and the interior, which I did not get to see. It is a private golf club. (Golfers can sample the course with a day pass.)

The video on the page, from the Golf Channel, says the design was based on a home for a certain screen legend. No spoiler from me.

The website also devotes a page to Frank Lloyd Wright’s design, with more photos.  I’m glad I bought that travel guidebook! I did not expect this in Maui.

Me at Kapalua Bay, Maui
Me at Kapalua Bay, Maui

 

“Past Pamela” Photo in the L.A. Times

If you did not see me in my 1890s costume at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, “the country’s largest literary event,” and  missed my photo in the  Times’ print edition (which got me out of bed in a flash Monday morning), see the link on the “About Pamela” page of this blog.  Click on the tab above to get there.  Yes, the costume was fun.

Don’t miss “Max Factor’s Hollywood Magic,” my previous post.